Archive for May, 2017

The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum Thanks Nancy and Sam Hipsher

May 18, 2017 |  by  |  Comments Off on The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum Thanks Nancy and Sam Hipsher

Our thanks to our latest contributors to the Noah Blake Cabin Restoration fund, Nancy and Sam Hipsher, who included a very nice letter with their donation. Nancy and Sam bought, disassembled, moved, and repaired two antique barns for use on their historic property. Sam sounds to me like a kindred spirit of Eric Sloane, judging by Nancy’s description of his talent and dedication to the restoration of their property. Nancy wrote “We wish you good luck on your Noah Blake cabin rebuilding in 2018 and look forward to hearing more about your project as you proceed. Eric Sloane would surely have appreciated your efforts as they represent the best of community and neighborly spirit.” Thank you, Nancy and Sam.

The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum Receives a Large Donation from The Oaklawn Foundation

May 18, 2017 |  by  |  Comments Off on The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum Receives a Large Donation from The Oaklawn Foundation

It is with gratitude that we accept a very generous financial gift from The Oaklawn Foundation, c/o Will Kies. Thank you!

Eric Sloane’s Diary of An Early American Boy: How to make Noah Blake’s Quill Pen

May 18, 2017 |  by  |  Comments Off on Eric Sloane’s Diary of An Early American Boy: How to make Noah Blake’s Quill Pen

Here is part three in our video series that examines Eric Sloane’s Diary of An Early American Boy Noah Blake:  1805.  In this video, Edith and I show how to make your very own quill pen following Eric’s directional drawings from the book:

Eric Sloane and Diary of An Early American Boy

May 18, 2017 |  by  |  Comments Off on Eric Sloane and Diary of An Early American Boy

Eric Sloane’s Diary of an Early American Boy

 It will come as no surprise to those of you who know us that we find nearly every work, literary and artistic, of Eric Sloane’s inspirational.  Eric Sloane, N.A. (1905-1985) was an incredibly talented artist and author who chronicled much of early American life and culture. His personal journey to becoming one of the world’s most successful artists is fascinating.

One of the books Eric wrote that we find particularly interesting is Eric Sloane’s Diary of An Early American Boy, which chronicles part of the year in the life of one young Noah Blake.  Noah had written a diary in the year 1805, a diary Eric found more than 150 years later and turned it in to this classic book for young adults.  You can read about Eric Sloane, the book, and the Noah Blake cabin here.  Edith and I created a website devoted to the book and the cabin, which was re-created on the grounds of the Eric Sloane Museum by Eric himself in the early 1970s.  Our goal is to explain thoroughly how the book can and should be used by students to learn American history, mathematics, physics, art, social studies, geometry, and much more.

Our current effort related to this project is the production of a series of videos to introduce the book and show viewers how to make a diary and a quill pen like the ones Noah used in Diary of An Early American Boy.  To date, we have created the introductory video:

and the instructional video for creating an replica of an early American diary:

Like all of our projects, we’re having a great time learning some new skills we never knew we were going to need (like video editing and voiceovers!).  You can follow us on our journey of exploration of Eric Sloane’s Diary of An Early American Boy through www.noahblakeproject.com.

Edith’s take:  Other than an artist and author, Eric Sloan was an inspirer, perhaps not to all, especially those who are not educated in the wonderful works of Eric Sloan. Part of the reason he is an inspirer [to me anyway] is his dedication to learning all about life in the early American days. He could tell you just about anything about the clouds, sky or [of course] early America. You don’t have many people who have/ are researching about early America. And once you stop and think about it, it is really very cool and must have took some serious dedication.

May 3, 2017 |  by  |  Comments Off on

2017: Noah Blake and His Wonderful Cabin

Saturday, May 6th – The Eric Sloane Museum kicks off the 2017 season with a series of lectures by President of the Kent Historical Association, Friends of the Eric Sloane board member, and historian Mike Everett. The first lecture, Nature: the Howling Wilderness will be held from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on May 6th. This talk examines the religious implications of “the untamed wilderness”. For example, early settlers took literally the biblical ideal that man is to organize the land, so colonists brought with them new plants that were to alter the landscape. What are the implications today? Suggested donation of $10 per class or purchase a Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum family level membership for $35 for the year and attend all four classes for free (and receive some great benefits, too!). This lecture includes admission to the museum. Other membership levels are also available.

Saturday & Sunday, May 5th & May 6th – Discounted Admission to the Eric Sloane Museum in conjunction with the Connecticut Antique Machinery Associations Spring Power Up.

Saturday, May 20th – The second in the lecture series sponsored by the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum: Geometry – who owned land, how does it get subdivided? What types of regulations were in place compared to today’s standards and what is the evolution of restrictions? This lecture will be held from 9 to 10:30 on May 20th. Suggested donations $10 per class or free with the purchase of a Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum family level membership.

Saturday, June 3rd – The third in the lecture series sponsored by the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum: Built Form – Built to Survive, looking for surplus, wealth, organizations of building, how convention of building changes, how a building indicated status using ornamentation to enhance appearance of class. Ordinary versus extraordinary equaled the distinction that continues through today. This lecture will be held Saturday, June 3rd from 9 to 10:30 on June 3rd. Suggested donations $10 per class or free with the purchase of a Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum family level membership.

Saturday June 10th – Connecticut Open House, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Free admission to the Eric Sloane Museum. Learn about the restoration of the Noah Blake Cabin, view early American tools and methods of construction that would have been used to build a c. 1805 structure, take a tour of the cabin with Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum founder Jim Mauch, and learn about our upcoming hands-on classes in traditional building skills.

Tuesday, July 4th – The museum will be open from 10 to 4 with the traditional bell ringing at 2:00 PM. The bell ringing is free but admission is charged to visit the museum.

Saturday, August 19th Ye Olde Tyme Outhouse program in conjunction with the return of the Noah Blake outhouse, restored off-site by the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum. Historian Georg Papp will bring outhouse models representing separate eras in addition to display boards, photos and articles. This talk will be informative as well as entertaining with some American history mixed in. The lecture is free but donations on behalf of the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum are welcome. 10 A.M., followed by the re-dedication of the restored Noah Blake outhouse. Sponsored by the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum.

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, September 22nd, 23rd, & 24th. Discount admission is being offered in conjunction with the Connecticut Antique Machinery’s Fall Festival, 10 to 4 each day. On Saturday, September 23rd, from noon until 3 p.m., learn about the restoration of the Noah Blake Cabin, view early American tools and methods of construction that would have been used to build a c. 1805 structure, take a tour of the cabin with Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum founder Jim Mauch, and learn about our upcoming hands-on classes in traditional building skills.

October – Fundraising event to raise money for the restoration of the Noah Blake Cabin. More information to be announced.

For more information on any of these programs, please call the museum at 860-927-3849

          I hope that I might be quoted someday as having said: “The only value of age is that it gave time for someone to have done something worthwhile”.

-Eric Sloane, The Second Barrel

 

Your support helps to preserve and promote Eric Sloane’s legacy.

Find us on the web: www.friendsoftheericsloanemuseum.org

On Facebook: Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum