Archive for February, 2014

February 28, 2014 |  by  |  No Comments

 

 

 

 

For the 2014 season, the Eric Sloane Museum, in conjunction with the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum, will be dedicating themselves to the exploration of Eric Sloane’s treatment of the sky and weather.  I’ll be posting updates concerning specific dates and events, but for now I thought I might share some photographs of a mural that was created by Eric Sloane very early in his career.  No doubt you’ll be able to guess from what kind of building the mural was removed, but do you know where the mural currently resides?  A hint – it is in a public building on Long Island, NY…

February 28, 2014 |  by  |  No Comments

          The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum have, with the permission of the estate of Eric Sloane, released a set of blank notecards with an image of Eric Sloane’s painting February on the front.  These Eric Sloane themed notecards are blank inside, 5 to a pack with envelopes.  Packs are $7.00 each, and 100% of the sales goes to the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum.  Cards are for sale at the Eric Sloane Museum, or can be purchased through the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum.  When ordering, please include $1.75 for 1st class USPS postage.

February 27, 2014 |  by  |  No Comments

A close examination of the area where vertical corner posts meet horizontal log layers reveal that each log is matched to the corner post, evidenced by the roman numerals clearly visible in the logs.  Proof the house was disassembled and moved at one point in it’s long life?  Not so.  Eric Sloane in An Age of Barns illustrated how barn raisings (and house raisings) were coordinated by a professional jointer (barn wright or house wright), who was responsible for ensuring that the structure went up according to plan.  His apprentice and helpers cut the timbers, hewd the logs, and gathered the sundry other materials to fashion a barn or a house.  The farmer was responsible for rounding up neighbors on “raising day”.   When that day finally came, everyone assembled needed to quickly understand how everything was to go together – you didn’t want to have to ask a lot of question when a 16′ oak beam is 18′ in the air.  The roman numerals were struck into each log (incidentally, roman numerals were used as they could be formed easily with a chisel) by the house wright upon final inspection – and while everything was still in the ground and had been test fitted.  When the moment came, everyone involved understood how the pieces fit together, making for a comparatively quick and safe community effort, one that would be repeated many times.

February 27, 2014 |  by  |  No Comments

Here is Butch, helping to transport us “Weather Hill Style”.  He seemed quite impressed with his ability to “jingle”, thanks to an old strap of sleigh bells given to me by my grandfather many years ago.  See Eric Sloane’s The Sound of Bells for a great overview on the many hundreds if not thousands of different bells available to the early American traveler.  Indeed, bells of early America were not for show – they were an indispensable safety item in that they warned people of the approach of a sleigh.  The quiet of cold winter nights, sound muffled by the deep snows and hats and scarfs, the almost effortless silence with which sleighs glided across the frozen landscape – not to mention the darkness – conspired to make an incoming sleigh a potential hazard.  Sleigh bells were a kind of constant but pleasant “horn” of sorts.  I have heard of New Englanders who knew who was passing by the farmstead by the pitch of the bells.  This is not as odd as it might at first seem, as each farmer usually crafted his own strap of bells of various size and number which would, to a trained ear, be able to be discerned from the strap of another neighbor.

February 4, 2014 |  by  |  No Comments

The Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum are looking for a pilot with experience with flying early aircraft and how that experience is influenced by the weather who would be willing to speak about his/her experiences at the Eric Sloane Museum in Kent, CT this summer.  The museum is highlighting Eric Sloane’s work in explaining meteorological and atmospheric phenomenon to pilots in via his publications for the Army Air Corps (c. 1942-1945), as well as Eric’s work related to painting military and civilian aircraft and “cloudscapes”, which was the term Eric Sloane used to describe his renditions of clouds and the atmosphere.  If you know of a c. WWII pilot, or someone who flew in the late 1940s-late 1950s, the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum would really appreciate hearing from you.  Thank you!